ReMarketing vs. ReTargeting: What’s the difference? | BostInno

10:00 PM

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In marketing there are a lot of different terms thrown around and quite often terms are interchanged as if they were one in the same. BostInno writer Mike Arsenault does a good job here explaining two terms that people often confuse:

ReMarketing vs. ReTargeting: What’s the difference? | BostInno

The main takeaway for people who are trying to understand the differences between ReMarketing and ReTargeting is, according to Mike:

"Retargeting is most often used to describe online ad placements and display ads.

While you may hear retargeting tools referred to as remarketing tools (ahem, Google), “remarketing” is typically used when email is involved."

Folks, that is about as simple as it gets. If you can remember this then it will be easy to sort out which idea you are talking about at any given time.

Now, the next question of course is which is more useful or effective? In my opinion I think that retargeting can quickly lead to a situation of diminishing returns. Think about it, I came to your site and wasn't interested in your product for whatever reason and now you are going to invest time and dollars following me around to other places trying to reinterest me?

I am not saying of course that it can't work but I would say that as a business unless you are incredibly sophisticated in your PPC programs, landing pages strategies and cost per customer models you run the risk of hopping on the retargeting bandwagon and spending an awful lot of time and money that might be better spent in getting your initial PPC and landing page programs performing at a higher level. I am leery of retargeting primarily because I see it as not really addressing the main issue of why didn't I buy or respond to a call to action in the first place.

So, if I had my choice, and often I do, I would definitely focus optimizing the initial contact point of the PPC and landing page strategy and then bringing in remarketing as a way to up-sell and cross-sell customers that have converted or made those first steps in your key calls to action.

Thanks,

Ed
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Ed Loessi

Is the image of marketing still faceless blobs and stick people?

1:30 PM

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I was doing an image search today for an idea I had and I did one on Google for Marketing Images, after looking at the results page for a minute I realized that 95%+ of the images were all faceless, stick people versions in one way shape or form. I thought, how odd that even despite years of rhetoric about how marketing campaigns need to be personal and personalized, still the most common images associated with marketing appear as faceless blobs.

It may be one of the reasons that new ideas like Pinterest have taken off so quickly, because people are looking for real images, real life things that they can point to and share.

Now I realize that these are just images about marketing and not necessarily marketing campaigns, but it does go deep into the psyche of the average marketer. If you accept that your industry image is about faceless blobs as how you commonly explain what you do, then you run the risk of letting that infiltrate your own ideas.

My advice? Run, run from the faceless blob that is haunting the dark corners of marketing, seek refuge in real pictures and video, create something that people want to share!
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Ed Loessi

Content Marketing for Professional and Consulting Services - via Content Marketing Institute

2:24 PM

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Content Marketing for Professional and Consulting Services


As this article in the Content Marketing Institute points out there has always been concern by professional service firms about telling their clients too much about their methodology or their process, for fear that some will just try and implement the ideas on their own. For two main reasons this is incorrect:
  • Companies are engaging you because they don’t have the time or people to create and implement a plan and
  • It’s one thing to read about something but a completely different thing to actually have done something in a variety of circumstances.
Bottom line, implementing a content marketing strategy in a professional service firm will show that you are not afraid of sharing and that your value is in the implementation and not just re-purposing what in some cases are widely known ideas and concepts or ideas already.
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Ed Loessi

Your Master List of Low-Hanging Marketing Fruit via Hubspot

10:03 PM

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This is a great list from the people over at Hubspot.


"When it comes to optimizing and improving your marketing programs, many marketers tend to think they need to go through these radical undertakings that completely overhaul their entire marketing strategy. While major change can sometimes be good, a lot of times, marketers overlook the little things they can do to incrementally improve their marketing results."


Your Master List of Low-Hanging Marketing Fruit

The truth is while they refer to it as a list of low hanging fruit I suspect that most businesses are probably only carrying out 5-10 of the items on the list, which makes this much more of a total marketing plan if one can fully implement these items.

Thanks, Ed
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Conducting Competitive Analysis to Step Up Your Content Strategy - via Hubspot

10:19 PM

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I can always rely on Hubspot to come up with some great insights and the article below was no exception. The article was slightly longer than usual but it is very comprehensive and covers a very important part of developing an overall content marketing strategy, the Competitor Analysis.

"When you ask marketers who their competitors are, they can rattle off a list quite quickly, and perhaps a few anecdotes about notable differentiators like product features, sales techniques, and site structure. Maybe they'd like to know more information about them (say, their marketing techniques?) but that information is all kept pretty hush hush. Right?"

How to Conduct Competitive Analysis to Step Up Your Content Strategy

An additional thought. One of the things in the article that wasn't covered was what if you find that your competitors happen to be bad content marketers?

In example, they rarely blog, they have no case studies and they are only marginally active on social networks. This sometimes happens in markets where the majority of the companies are in startup mode or where you are attacking a small portion of an enterprise or government market where a company is not concentrating its marketing. Think the early days of enterprise messaging/collaboration and a company like Yammer that chipped away at the now common collaboration space very successfully. They would probably have had little to write about because big enterprise software companies still thought that was just a feature of a much larger system.

So,what do you do to determine what content you should be writing about in order to lead the competition if you find yourself in those situations?

Well, probably the best way to do that is by looking at search terms to see what is bringing people to a site, both yours and your competitors. There are a number of search discovery tools that you can use on a site to see how it is being indexed etc. so even if additional marketing content is not being written you can get a sense of what is driving people to that particular site.

As well, if you've already started blogging about what you believe your customers are interested then check the top content draws on your site and continue producing content in those areas. You can also survey your early beta users and ask them about their main challenges and why they think your product is helping them overcome those challenges. These insights will provide you with a number of good ideas and themes to regularly produce content for marketing purposes.

Over time you will discover more ways and more customers that are being impacted by your product and you can just focus on those stories and solutions as you build out that content marketing process.

Check out Hubspot's free Ebook below as a good resource as well.


Thanks,

Ed

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Ed Loessi

How does a startup attract successful people who are already involved in other ventures? | LinkedIn

10:03 AM

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How does a startup attract successful people who are already involved in other ventures? | LinkedIn:

I think it really comes down to a nurturing process. What I mean by that is a startup should think about the people they are going to need, programmers, sales, marketers etc. and then they should start early by connecting with those people via local meetups, social media and Linkedin.

For those that they are able to connect with (it may be a whole pool in each category) they should follow any blogs that they are writing, retweet, comment, and share any interesting things they see those people talking about and hopefully that will lead to a degree of familiarity, which may make it easy to approach them at some time in the future.

This of course is a drip feed process, if you need someone right away this nurturing process isn't going to work, but if you start early getting people interested in what you are doing and being interested in what they are doing then you will find that it is a pretty good way of finding good people when it's your turn to grow.

Thanks,

Ed

Ed Loessi

A few thoughts from Bijan Sabet • Patience & Persistence

8:16 AM

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"When you go to a tech meetup, tech party, or read tech headlines, it’s easy to get swept away into thinking things are soaring for a number of startups. Company xyz now has a zillion users, another company just went viral, overnight sensation, etc."

Bijan Sabet • Patience & Persistence

I've always liked Bijan's take on things both from an investor as well as an entrepreneur's view. He really hits the nail on the head here with some realities; many companies we consider successful today really struggled for long periods before they became well known and that growth is not always an upward trend. I myself love attending local tech events and love hearing about the success of startup companies and each time I do I keep thinking wow! am I doing enough with marketing and business development to make sure we come out on top? and then we buckle down and increase our efforts.

So, any company that is out there definitely needs to be attending the local tech events (which most are as seen in the local Boston attendance) and you need to look for those companies that are having success and talk to them, see what they are doing and learn from their marketing and customer acquisition process. It may be hard to get info from a direct competitor but you can keep an eye out along the edges of what they are doing, however, you can look at all other companies and see what you can apply from their activities. All companies have to promote their products (marketing) and find new customers (sales) and develop customers use of the product (customer service) etc. So, look, listen, learn, and apply.

Thanks,

Ed

Ed Loessi

Why Marketing Automation is not Inbound Marketing | Business 2 Community

6:44 PM

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"There is a common misconception among B2B marketers. Spurred by the digitisation of marketing communication and the need for better targeted and more relevant content, many erroneously believe that marketing automation (MA) and inbound marketing are exactly the same thing. This can’t be further from the truth."

Why Marketing Automation is not Inbound Marketing | Business 2 Community

Well worth the read!

Thanks,

Ed

Ed Loessi

How to Get Value from Twitter as an Individual

7:50 PM

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I've been a fairly active user of Twitter, since March of 2007. Now, not being someone famous, I don't have 10's of 1000's of followers, just a bit over 2000 as of the writing of this blog. When I first started I thought that it would be a really good way to connect with lots of people that were in fact famous but it turns out famous people don't really follow you back.

Oh, before we go too far, let me define famous. For me famous people are business people and thought leaders in the startup technology and marketing space, which is where I myself work. For you famous could be thought leaders in your career space or in your personal interests and hobbies.

So, tonight I was clearing out my Twitter account of people who haven't followed me back over the last 30 days (using Tweepi) and I really solidified in my mind what I wanted out of Twitter and how it could really benefit me as an individual (I have spent lots of time building Twitter accounts in business, but for an individual it is different).

What I want from Twitter is pretty simple:
  1. I want to form a general information sharing relationship with people in the geographic area I live in - Boston.
  2. I want to connect with people in the startup space so that I can find out about new startup companies and events that are beneficial to startup companies.
  3. I want to find out about things that can help me be a better marketer
  4. I want to be entertained every once in a while.

In thinking this through I realized that I didn't need to be connected to or followed back by famous people, I just needed to connect with people who have a good balance of following and followers, who were fairly regular tweeters about the things that we are jointly interested in and that were primarily living and working in the same metropolitan area.

Now, before you say "but how will you know about what the thought leaders a.k.a. the famous people are thinking if you are not connected to them?" Well, quite simply I get most of my thought leadership fill by subscribing to their blogs and seeing things come through on my rss feed, so I was really rarely missing anything from a Chris Brogan or a Seth Godin or the likes. Truth is I am much more interested in what my local Boston friends have to say after having read something by the thought leaders.

So, what is my advice?, it's simple really; follow people in the cities or states you work in, just in case you meet them on the street, follow people who have a good balance of followers and following (not someone who has 6000 followers and only follows 60), follow people who are active in the things that interest you in your career and in your hobbies, and follow people who are always throwing in something random, as they will entertain you, and most importantly follow people people who have an actual comment on a tweet and not just retweeting something that came down the channel.

Thanks,

Ed

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Ed Loessi

KNOW and BELIEVE Your Elevator Pitch, Don't Just Memorize It - Joe Caruso's blog

6:58 PM

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"We do entrepreneurs a disservice by calling it a "pitch".... This should not be thought of as something separate and distinct.... crafted for the sole purpose of raising money... it should an integral part of one's business."

Great reminder from top mentor Joe Caruso about being able to pitch your business at any moment, if you don't know it you probably are not going to be successful.

The truth is this is the same not only if you are creating a startup or one of the early staff in one, it is also true if you are involved in sales and marketing in any form. People want to know that you understand the business and that you can help them to understand it as well. People want to work with those that believe and believing is most often about understanding what it is you do and explaining it in the simplest terms.

KNOW and BELIEVE Your Elevator Pitch, Don't Just Memorize It - Joe Caruso's blog

Ed Loessi

Very Cool! - Enstitute Launches an Alternative University for Entrepreneurs

8:29 PM

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Very cool!

TNW The Next Web writer Brian McCarty uncovers a really great concept/business called Enstitute, which is asking the question "If you want to be an entrepreneur, do you have to go to college?"

Enstitute Launches an Alternative University for Entrepreneurs

There has long been a debate as to the value of a college eduction, to an entrepreneur, a very expensive proposition even at a state university. There have been all types of approaches from dropping out to start a company, starting a company while in college, The Zuckerberg Model (countless others as well of course), to going directly to work at a startup right after college.

The Enstitute's plan, which involves having a 2 year internship and hands on work under the mentorship of successful business people, looks like another solid attempt to separate entrepreneurship from the bonds of a costly and sometimes nearly useless college education. Don't get me wrong I think college is definitely a viable and worthwhile channel to success for many types of careers and I do like the idea that Kaplan an educational company is working on developing a curriculum for Enstitute, as I think that the 18-24 years this program is targeting still need to be organized down at least some sort of pathway.

This is one approach amongst many to keep an eye on, there are some great people involved and they are on the right track.

Thanks,

Ed
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Ed Loessi

Google's Latitude Leaderboards Could Come to Google+ - Really?

8:04 PM

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Saw this snippet on possible check-ins and gameification within Google+ on TNW - The Next Web

Google's Latitude Leaderboards Could Come to Google+

"The new update sees Latitude Leaderboards quietly launch within the app, awarding points to users that check-in using Google’s rarely-used independent check-in service. As soon as a Latitude location is selected within the app, a small leaderboard is displayed and points tallied to the user’s leaderboard score."

My Take:

It struck me odd that this was compared to Foursquare simply because Google+ and Foursquare based on what we know about both of these business models couldn't be further apart. I mean really, Google+ is about content sharing and Foursquare is about activity sharing on the individual side and advertising on the business side (the real side because that is where the money is). I may be wrong and it wouldn't be the first time but I struggle to see how you would really add check-ins to the Google+ process as it is simply an unrelated activity. If you were going to add check-ins to any Google product it would be mobile search or Google Places.

My suggestion, let's stop taking every new Google development and trying to figure out how it is going to fit into Google+

Thanks,

Ed
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Ed Loessi